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Frontenac Youth Services is excited to celebrate the Lunar New Year!

The Lunar New Year as a celebration is observed by numerous cultures. It is featured in the Chinese calendar of the East Asian cultural sphere, the Hindu-Buddhist calendars of South and Southeast Asia, the Islamic calendar and the Jewish calendar in the Middle East, and is also celebrated by the indigenous Nisga'a people of Canada.

Chinese New Year is the festival that celebrates the beginning of a new year on the traditional Chinese lunisolar calendar. It was traditionally a time to honor deities and ancestors, and it has also become a time to feast and visit family members.

Each Chinese year is associated with an animal sign according to the Chinese zodiac cycle. 2023 is the year of the Rabbit, a symbol of longevity, peace, and prosperity. 2023 is predicted to be a year of hope.

We wish you all the best in the year of the Rabbit, 2023!
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Frontenac Youth Services is excited to celebrate the Lunar New Year!The Lunar New Year as a celebration is observed by numerous cultures. It is featured in the Chinese calendar of the East Asian cultural sphere, the Hindu-Buddhist calendars of South and Southeast Asia, the Islamic calendar and the Jewish calendar in the Middle East, and is also celebrated by the indigenous Nisgaa people of Canada.Chinese New Year is the festival that celebrates the beginning of a new year on the traditional Chinese lunisolar calendar. It was traditionally a time to honor deities and ancestors, and it has also become a time to feast and visit family members.Each Chinese year is associated with an animal sign according to the Chinese zodiac cycle. 2023 is the year of the Rabbit, a symbol of longevity, peace, and prosperity. 2023 is predicted to be a year of hope.We wish you all the best in the year of the Rabbit, 2023!

Tamils, a Tamil language speaking ethnic group started to migrate to Canada in early 1940s mostly from Sri Lanka and a small percentage from Tamil Nadu state in South India. Tamil is considered as a classic language such Hebrew and Latin. Genetic and Archaeological evidence suggest that Tamil Ethnic group lived in India around 6000 BC.

The Tamil diaspora comes with a rich history, culture, art, literature, resiliency, and strength, the attributes carried over generations and continue to develop them in the Canadian soil as well.

Tamil Heritage Month co-incidentally falls with Thai Pongal, a traditional Tamil harvest festival.

Thai Pongal day is contemporarily considered the first day of the Tamil Calendar which falls on January 14th of 2023.
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Tamils, a Tamil language speaking ethnic group started to migrate to Canada in early 1940s mostly from Sri Lanka and a small percentage from Tamil Nadu state in South India. Tamil is considered as a classic language such Hebrew and Latin.  Genetic and Archaeological evidence suggest that Tamil Ethnic group lived in India around 6000 BC.The Tamil diaspora comes with a rich history, culture, art, literature, resiliency, and strength, the attributes carried over generations and continue to develop them in the Canadian soil as well.Tamil Heritage Month co-incidentally falls with Thai Pongal, a traditional Tamil harvest festival.Thai Pongal day is contemporarily considered the first day of the Tamil Calendar which falls on January 14th of 2023.

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Quviasukvik ties the past to the present and displays many central values of Inuit tradition.

The Quviasukvik festivities start on Christmas Eve and ends on January 7. During these days, many customs are displayed, including parades, concerts, carnivals, fairs, Inuit traditional activities, family meals, visiting friends and relatives, gift giving, goodwill greetings, reflection, fireworks, and qulliq (seal-oil lamp) ceremonies.

From our families to yours, we wish you a happy and healthy holiday season!
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Quviasukvik ties the past to the present and displays many central values of Inuit tradition.The Quviasukvik festivities start on Christmas Eve and ends on January 7. During these days, many customs are displayed, including parades, concerts, carnivals, fairs, Inuit traditional activities, family meals, visiting friends and relatives, gift giving, goodwill greetings, reflection, fireworks, and qulliq (seal-oil lamp) ceremonies.From our families to yours, we wish you a happy and healthy holiday season!
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